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 'Fetal Ultrasound' 
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Result : Searchterm 'Fetal Ultrasound' found in 1 term [] and 6 definitions [], (+ 12 Boolean[] results)
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News  (10)  Resources  (33)  
 
Fetal UltrasoundMRI Resource Directory:<br> - Fetal -
 
The FDA ultrasound regulations allow an eight-fold increase in ultrasound intensity to be used in fetal ultrasound examinations. They place considerably responsibility on the user to understand the output measurements, the mechanical index (MI), the thermal index (TI) and to use them in their scanning. The primary safety concern in prenatal diagnostic imaging is temperature rise. It is known that hyperthermia is teratogenic. The efforts of investigators have concentrated on defining the temperature increases and exposure times which may give rise to biological effects and on determining the ultrasound levels which might, in turn, lead to those temperature rises.
In fetal ultrasound, the highest temperature increase would be expected to occur at bone and the thermal index with bone at/near the focus (TIB) would give the ‘worst case’ conditions. The mechanical index and thermal index must be displayed if the ultrasound system is capable of exceeding an index of 1. The displayed indices are based on the manufacturer’s experimental and modeled data. However, an independent study has demonstrated significant discrepancies over declared spatial peak time averaged intensity (I-SPTA) output of up to 400%.
See also ALARA Principle, Pregnancy Ultrasound and Doppler Fluximetry in Pregnancy.
Radiology-tip.comRadiation Safety
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Radiology-tip.comFetal MRI
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• View the news results for 'Fetal Ultrasound' (3).


• Related Searches:
    • Obstetric and Gynecologic Ultrasound
    • Pelvic Ultrasound
    • Mechanical Index
    • Thermal Index
    • Ultrasound Regulations

 Further Reading:
  Basics:
Pelvic ultrasoundOpen this link in a new window
   by www.surgeryencyclopedia.com    
Guidelines for the Safe Use of Diagnostic Ultrasound(.pdf)Open this link in a new window
   by folk.ntnu.no    
Searchterm 'Fetal Ultrasound' was also found in the following service: 
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MRI  (1) Open this link in a new window
4D UltrasoundInfoSheet: - Modes - 
Intro, 
Overview, 
Types of, 
etc.MRI Resource Directory:<br> - Modes -
 
As far as ultrasound is concerned, 4D ultrasound (also referred to as live 3D ultrasound or 4B-mode) is the latest ultrasound technology - the fourth dimension means length, width, and depth over time. 4D Ultrasound takes 3D ultrasound images and adds the element of time to the progress so that a moving three-dimensional image is seen on the monitor. A 4D scan takes the same amounts of time as a 2D or 3D scan; the difference is the ultrasound equipment being used. One advantage of a 4D fetal ultrasound to a 2D-mode is that parents can see how their baby will generally look like. However, there are different opinions over the medical advantages.
To scan a 3D ultrasound image, the probe is swept over the maternal abdomen. A computer takes multiple images and renders the 3D picture. With 4D imaging, the computer takes the images as multiple pictures while the probe is hold still and a 3D image is simultaneously rendered in real time on a monitor.
In most cases, the standard 2D ultrasound is taken, and then the 3D/4D scan capability is added if an abnormality is detected or suspected. The 3D/4D sonogram is then focused on a specific area, to provide the details needed to assess and diagnose a suspected problem. A quick 4D scan of the face of the fetus may be performed at the end of a routine exam, providing the parents with a photo.
Radiology-tip.comFluoroscopy
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Radiology-tip.comTemporal Resolution
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• View the news results for '4D Ultrasound' (5).



 Further Reading:
  Basics:
Impulse Imaging 4D Imaging : 4D Ultrasound, 4D Radar, 4D Sonar, ... Real Time 3D Imaging using Ellipsoidal BackprojectionOpen this link in a new window
2001   by www.impulseimaging.net    
  News & More:
Ultrasound: Weighing the Propaganda Against the FactsOpen this link in a new window
   by www.midwiferytoday.com    
US Resources  
Services and Supplies - Liver - Image Libraries - Distributors - Thyroid - Gynecology
 
Pediatric UltrasoundMRI Resource Directory:<br> - Pediatric -
 
Ultrasound is the ideal tool to examine children of all ages. It is fast, painless, uses no ionizing radiation, and does not require a baby to remain still for long periods. Real-time modes show movement of internal tissues and organs. Advanced ultrasound imaging techniques such as color Doppler, 4D ultrasound, harmonic imaging, and higher resolution, as well as the application of ultrasound contrast agents broaden the potential of ultrasound.
Pediatric [paediatric, Brit.] ultrasound can be used in all body regions and reduce the number of more invasive or radiating examinations that often additionally need sedation or intravenous iodinated contrast agents.
See also Fetal Ultrasound, Reflux Sonography, Ultrasound Safety, Abdominal Ultrasound and Pregnancy Ultrasound.
Radiology-tip.comComputed Tomography
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Radiology-tip.comMRI Scan
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• View the news results for 'Pediatric Ultrasound' (1).



 Further Reading:
  Basics:
Pediatric Ultrasound TodayOpen this link in a new window
   by www.chrestomathic.com    
Searchterm 'Fetal Ultrasound' was also found in the following services: 
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News  (10)  Resources  (33)  
 
Pelvic UltrasoundMRI Resource Directory:<br> - Pelvic -
 
A pelvic ultrasound is commonly used during pregnancy to check on the prenatal development of the fetus. Gynecologic ultrasonography is a tool to image the female pelvic organs, like uterus, ovaries, Fallopian tubes, bladder, pouch of Douglas, and pelvic pathology of relevance outside of pregnancy. Male pelvic ultrasound checks the health of the bladder and prostate.
Pelvic ultrasound can be performed externally through the abdominal wall, transvaginal or transrectal. A full bladder is advantageous in obstetric and gynecologic ultrasound, because sound waves passes very well through liquid; the bladder is used as an acoustic window to see deeper structures and to push the bowel out the way, allowing for better imaging. If the bladder can not be made full enough, or if the gas within the bowel makes imaging difficult, transvaginal sonography is the most effective way of imaging the pelvis.
See also Fetal Ultrasound, Transvaginal Sonography, Vaginal Probe, Urologic Ultrasound, Reflux Sonography and Transrectal Sonography.
Radiology-tip.comAbdomen CT
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Radiology-tip.comAbdominal Imaging
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• View the news results for 'Pelvic Ultrasound' (1).



 Further Reading:
  Basics:
Female pelvis - ultrasound anatomyOpen this link in a new window
   by rad.usuhs.mil    
Medical Physics: Ultrasound - extended reading exerciseOpen this link in a new window
   by www.cyberphysics.pwp.blueyonder.co.uk    
General Pelvis Anatomy, UltrasoundOpen this link in a new window
   by rad.usuhs.mil    
Three-Dimensional Ultrasound in Gynecology: Where is it Applicable?Open this link in a new window
   by www.gehealthcare.com    
  News & More:
Acute Appendicitis Diagnosed by UltrasoundOpen this link in a new window
   by rad.usuhs.mil    
Ultrasound appearances of pelvic inflammatory disease. Patient A: Hydrosalpinx. Patient B: Pyosalpinx. Patient C: Tubo-ovarian abscess.Open this link in a new window
   by rad.usuhs.mil    
Searchterm 'Fetal Ultrasound' was also found in the following service: 
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MRI  (1) Open this link in a new window
Pregnancy UltrasoundMRI Resource Directory:<br> - Obstetric -
 
Pregnancy ultrasound testing is used as a screening to verify due date, determine causes of bleeding, check the overall health, development, gender and position of the baby, measure the amniotic fluid, and check the condition of the placenta.
About week five to seven, ultrasound is used to determine the size of the fetus, confirm the expected due date, and detect multiple fetuses. Ultrasound examinations show that the fetus is alive and distinguish between intrauterine or ectopic pregnancies.
About week 16 to 20, prenatal ultrasound confirms the growth, shows anatomic defects, the placenta and amniotic fluid.
Toward the end of pregnancy, the sonographer evaluates fetal size, position, growth, and the placenta.
Ultrasound guides the biopsy in amniocentesis procedures and chorionic villus sampling to collect cells from the placenta or amniotic fluid.
See also Doppler Fluximetry in Pregnancy, Fetal Ultrasound and Vaginal Probe.
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 Further Reading:
  Basics:
Female pelvis - ultrasound anatomyOpen this link in a new window
   by rad.usuhs.mil    
Online Ultrasound Clinical HandbookOpen this link in a new window
   by www.pear.co.nz    
  News & More:
ultrasound of blighted ovumOpen this link in a new window
   by rad.usuhs.mil    
EDUCATIONAL TUTORIALS: ULTRASOUND - IMAGING Open this link in a new window
   by www.obgyn.net    
US Resources  
Intravascular - Probes Transducers - Services and Supplies - Hospitals - Research Labs - Fetal
 
Related Searches:
 • Thermal Index
 • Ultrasound Safety
 • Pelvic Ultrasound
 • Obstetric and Gynecologic Ultrasound
 • Mechanical Index
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