UltraSound - Technology Information PortalMonday, 29 May 2017
Info
  Sheets



Out-
      side
 




 
 'Hertz' 
SEARCH FOR   
 
  12345ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWZ
Result : Searchterm 'Hertz' found in 1 term [] and 13 definitions [])
1 - 5 (of 14)     next
Result Pages : [1]  [2 3]
Searchterm 'Hertz' was also found in the following services: 
spacer
News  (1)  
 
HertzMRI Resource Directory:<br> - UltraSound Physics -
 
(Hz) The standard SI unit of frequency.
Definition: The number of repetitions of a periodic process per unit time. It is equal to the old unit cycles or oscillations each second of a simple harmonic motion. The unit is named for the German physicist Heinrich Rudolf Hertz.
Larger units are
kilohertz (kHz) = 1 000 Hz
megahertz (MHz) = 1 000 kHz
gigahertz (GHz) = 1 000 MHz
spacer
• Related Searches:
    • Resonant Frequency
    • Sonographic Features
    • Fundamental Frequency
    • Harmonic Imaging
    • Wavelength

 Further Reading:
  Basics:
UltrasoundOpen this link in a new window
Thursday, 20 October 2005   by en.wikipedia.org    
Searchterm 'Hertz' was also found in the following service: 
spacer
Radiology  (4) Open this link in a new windowMRI  (8) Open this link in a new window
FrequencyMRI Resource Directory:<br> - UltraSound Physics -
 
(F) The number of cycles of a periodic process per unit time. Frequency and wavelength are inversely related. The higher the frequency the smaller the wavelength. The frequency of ultrasound is expressed in units of hertz (Hz), where 1 Hz = 1 cycle per second.
The effect of different frequencies on tissue penetration:
The higher the frequency the less the penetration, the lower the frequency the greater the penetration. As frequency increases, resolution improves but the imaging depth or penetration decreases. The lower the axial resolution, the more detail can be seen.
Usual frequencies for pediatric ultrasound: 5.0mHz to 7.5mHz and 10mHz.
Usual frequencies for adult ultrasound: 2.0mHz to 3.0mHz.
See also Doppler Interrogation Frequency, Multi-frequency Probe, and Huygens Principle.
Radiology-tip.comFrequency
spacer
Radiology-tip.comFrequency
spacer

• View the news results for 'Frequency' (6).



 Further Reading:
  Basics:
An Introduction to UltrasoundOpen this link in a new window
   by www.cis.rit.edu    
  News & More:
Normal Ultrasound of the SpineOpen this link in a new window
   by rad.usuhs.mil    
US Resources  
UltraSound Training Courses - Veterinary UltraSound - 3d UltraSound - Portals - Research Labs - Societies
 
Hi Vision 5500 - EUB-5500InfoSheet: - Devices -
Intro, 
TypesMRI Resource Directory:<br> - Devices Machines Scanners Systems -
 
www.hitachimed.com/products/ultrasound/eub_5500.asp

From Hitachi Medical Corporation (HMC), sales, marketing and service in the US by Hitachi Medical Systems America Inc.
The HI VISION™ 5500 - EUB-5500 fully digital ultrasound system delivers the latest generation of signal processing technology, sophisticated transducer design, and a host of features and options for advanced imaging capabilities across a wide range of clinical situations. This system is compatible with all Pentax ultrasound endoscopes.


Device Information and Specification
APPLICATIONS Abdominal, brachytherapy/cryotherapy, breast, cardiac, dedicated biopsy, endoscopic, intraoperative, laparoscopic, musculoskeletal, OB/GYN, pediatric, small parts, urologic, vascular
CONFIGURATION Compact system
TRANSDUCERS Five frequency (except mini-probes)
RANGE OF PROBE TYPE Linear, convex, radial, miniradial/miniprobe, biplane, phased array, echoendoscope longitudinal, echoendoscope radial
PROBE FREQUENCIES Linear: 5.0-13 MHz, convex: 2.5-7.5 MHz, phased: 2.0-7.5 MHz, sector: 2.0-7.5 MHz
IMAGING MODES 3 modes of dynamic tissue harmonic imaging (dTHI), pulsed wave Doppler, continuous wave Doppler, color flow imaging, power Doppler, directional power Doppler, color flow angiography, real-time Doppler measurements
IMAGING OPTIONS 3RD generation color artifact suppression
OPTIONAL PACKAGE 3D imaging, dual omni-directional M-mode display, steerable CW Doppler, Pentax EUS and Fujinon Mini-probe
STORAGE, CONNECTIVITY, OS Patient and image database management system, HDD, FDD, MOD, CD-ROM, Network, DICOM 3.0, Windows XP
DATA PROCESSING 12 bit gigasampling A/D for precise signal reproduction, Quadra beam processing for fast frame rates
H*W*D m (inch.) 1.40 x 0.51 x 0.79 (55 x 20 x 31)
WEIGHT 130 kg (286 lbs.)
POWER CONSUMPTION 1.2kVA
ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT 4096 btu/hr heat output
spacer

 Further Reading:
  Basics:
HI VISION 5500 Fully Digital Ultrasound systemOpen this link in a new window
   by www.pentaxmedical.com    
Searchterm 'Hertz' was also found in the following services: 
spacer
News  (1)  
 
Hi Vision™ 6500 - EUB-6500InfoSheet: - Devices -
Intro, 
TypesMRI Resource Directory:<br> - Devices Machines Scanners Systems -
 
www.hitachimed.com/products/ultrasound/eub_6500.asp

From Hitachi Medical Corporation (HMC), sales, marketing and service in the US by Hitachi Medical Systems America Inc.;
The HI VISION™ 6500 - EUB-6500 high resolution digital ultrasound system offers advanced clinical imaging, enhanced operating efficiency, and remarkable clinical flexibility, all in robust and versatile configuration that simply represents a better clinical solution in a variety of real-world, real-work arenas.


Device Information and Specification
APPLICATIONS Abdominal, brachytherapy/cryotherapy, breast, cardiac, dedicated biopsy, endoscopic, intraoperative, laparoscopic, musculoskeletal, OB/GYN, pediatric, small parts, urologic, vascular
CONFIGURATION Compact system
TRANSDUCERS Five frequency (except mini-probes), low impedance, wideband
RANGE OF PROBE TYPE Linear, convex, radial, miniradial/miniprobe, biplane, phased array, echoendoscope longitudinal, echoendoscope radial
PROBE FREQUENCIES Linear: 5.0-13 MHz, convex: 2.5-7.5 MHz, phased: 2.0-7.5 MHz, sector: 2.0-7.5 MHz
IMAGING MODES Tissue Doppler imaging (TDI), pulsed wave Doppler, continuous wave Doppler, color flow imaging, power Doppler, directional power Doppler, color flow angiography, real-time Doppler measurements, 4 modes of dynamic tissue harmonic imaging (dTHI), wideband pulse inversion imaging (WPI)
IMAGING OPTIONS 3RD generation color artifact suppression
OPTIONAL PACKAGE 3D ultrasound, dual omni-directional M-mode display, steerable CW Doppler, dynamic contrast harmonics imaging, stress echo, Pentax EUS and Fujinon Mini-probe
STORAGE, CONNECTIVITY, OS Patient and image database management system, HDD, FDD, MOD, CD-ROM, Network, DICOM 3.0, Windows XP
DATA PROCESSING 12 bit gigasampling A/D for precise signal reproduction, Quadra beam processing for fast frame rates
H*W*D m (inch.) 1.40 x 0.51 x 0.79 (55 x 20 x 31)
WEIGHT 130 kg (286 lbs.)
POWER CONSUMPTION 1.2kVA
ENVIRONMENTAL POLLUTION 4096 btu/hr heat output
spacer

Searchterm 'Hertz' was also found in the following service: 
spacer
Radiology  (4) Open this link in a new windowMRI  (8) Open this link in a new window
History of UltrasoundMRI Resource Directory:<br> - History of UltraSound -
 
point In 1880 the Curie brothers discovered the piezoelectric effect in quartz. Converse piezoelectricity was mathematically deduced from fundamental thermodynamic principles by Lippmann in 1881.
point In 1917, Paul Langevin (France) and his coworkers developed an underwater sonar system (called hydrophone) that uses the piezoelectric effect to detect submarines through echo location.
point In 1935, the first RADAR system was produced by the British physicist Robert Watson-Wat. Also about 1935, developments began with the objective to use ultrasonic power therapeutically, utilizing its heating and disruptive effects on living tissues. In 1936, Siemens markets the first ultrasonic therapeutic machine, the Sonostat.
point Shortly after the World War II, researchers began to explore medical diagnostic capabilities of ultrasound. Karl Theo Dussik (Austria) attempted to locate the cerebral ventricles by measuring the transmission of ultrasound beam through the skull. Other researchers try to use ultrasound to detect gallstones, breast masses, and tumors. These first investigations were performed with A-mode.
point Shortly after the World War II, researchers in Europe, the United States and Japan began to explore medical diagnostic capabilities of ultrasound. Karl Theo Dussik (Austria) attempted to locate the cerebral ventricles by measuring the transmission of ultrasound beam through the skull. Other researchers, e.g. George Ludwig (United States) tried to use ultrasound to detect gallstones, breast masses, and tumors. This first experimentally investigations were performed with A-mode. Ultrasound pioneers contributed innovations and important discoveries, for example the velocity of sound transmission in animal soft tissues with a mean value of 1540 m/sec (still in use today), and determined values of the optimal scanning frequency of the ultrasound transducer.
point In the early 50`s the first B-mode images were obtained. Images were static, without gray-scale information in simple black and white and compound technique. Carl Hellmuth Hertz and Inge Edler (Sweden) made in 1953 the first scan of heart activity. Ian Donald and Colleagues (Scotland) were specialized on obstetric and gynecologic ultrasound research. By continuous development it was possible to study pregnancy and diagnose possible complications.
point After about 1960 two-dimensional compound procedures were developed. The applications in obstetric and gynecologic ultrasound boomed worldwide from the mid 60’s with both, A-scan and B-scan equipment. In the late 60’s B-mode ultrasonography replaced A-mode in wide parts.
point In the 70’s gray scale imaging became available and with progress of computer technique ultrasonic imaging gets better and faster.
point After continuous work, in the 80’s fast realtime B-mode gray-scale imaging was developed. Electronic focusing and duplex flow measurements became popular. A wider range of applications were possible.
point In the 90’s, high resolution scanners with digital beamforming, high transducer frequencies, multi-channel focus and broad-band transducer technology became state of the art. Optimized tissue contrast and improved diagnostic accuracy lead to an important role in breast imaging and cancer detection. Color Doppler and Duplex became available and sensitivity for low flow was continuously improved.
point Actually, machines with advanced ultrasound system performance are equipped with realtime compound imaging, tissue harmonic imaging, contrast harmonic imaging, vascular assessment, matrix array transducers, pulse inversion imaging, 3D and 4D ultrasound with panoramic view.
read more

Radiology-tip.comDiagnostic Imaging
spacer
Radiology-tip.comMRI History
spacer

 Further Reading:
  News & More:
Physics Tutorial: Ultrasound PhysicsOpen this link in a new window
   by www.physics247.com    
A-Mode Area RatioOpen this link in a new window
   by www.wildultrasound.com    
US Resources  
General - Doppler UltraSound - Software - Liver - Education pool - Preferential Sites
 
Related Searches:
 • Fundamental Frequency
 • Oscillation
 • Resonant Frequency
 • Sonographic Features
 • Sound
SEARCH FOR   
 
  12345ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWZ
     1 - 5 (of 14)     next
Result Pages : [1]  [2 3]
 Random Page
 
Share This Page
FacebookTwitterLinkedIn

US-TIP    
Community   
User
Pass
Forgot your UserID/Password ?  


Look
      Ups



UltraSound - Technology Information Portal
Member of SoftWays' Medical Imaging Group - MR-TIP • Radiology-TIP • US-TIP • The-Medical-Market
Copyright © 2006 - 2016 SoftWays. All rights reserved.
Terms of Use | Privacy Policy | Advertising
 [last update: 2015-03-04 09:17:02]