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 'High Intensity Focused Ultrasound' 
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Result : Searchterm 'High Intensity Focused Ultrasound' found in 1 term [] and 12 definitions [])
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High Intensity Focused UltrasoundMRI Resource Directory:<br> - Ultrasound Therapy -
 
(HIFU / FUS) High intensity focused ultrasound is used in thermotherapy or thermoablation e.g., for the treatment of benign prostate hyperplasia or under study for the treatment of cancer.
An applied ultrasound probe (see transrectal sonography) focuses sound waves at one spot, elevating the tissue temperature to a point that the tissue destroys. Generally, lower frequencies (from 250 kHz to 2000 kHz) are used than for medical diagnostic ultrasound, but significantly higher time-averaged intensities.
See also Magnetic Resonance Guided Focused Ultrasound, Low Intensity Pulsed Ultrasound, and Lithotripsy.
Radiology-tip.comCT Guided Biopsy
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Radiology-tip.comMR Guided Interventions
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• View the news results for 'High Intensity Focused Ultrasound' (25).


• Related Searches:
    • Thermotherapy
    • Low Intensity Pulsed Ultrasound
    • Lithotripsy

 Further Reading:
  Basics:
MR-GUIDED HIGH-FOCUSED ULTRASOUND TREATMENT OF UTERINE FIBROIDS- REDUCTION IN FIBROID SIZE AND CLINICAL IMPROVEMENT(.pdf)Open this link in a new window
   by cds.ismrm.org    
Sound-field modification with acoustic lenses for high-intensity focused ultrasound therapyOpen this link in a new window
   by www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov    
  News & More:
In Situ Ablation Of Breast Tumors. What Is The State Of The Art?Open this link in a new window
2002   by www.cancernews.com    
Ultrasound Produces Less Unwanted EffectsOpen this link in a new window
2004   by www.annieappleseedproject.org    
Searchterm 'High Intensity Focused Ultrasound' was also found in the following service: 
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Radiology  (1) Open this link in a new window
BrachytherapyMRI Resource Directory:<br> - Ultrasound Guided Interventions -
 
Brachytherapy is a radiation therapy in which radioactive material (radioisotopes) sealed in needles, seeds or wires is placed directly into or near a tumor. Brachytherapy uses ultrasound imaging to visualize the needles for accurate placement of the small seeds or pellets (capsules) directly into e.g., the prostate. Ultrasound imaging allows accurate planning, placement and implantation of the radiation sources. Implantation of the seeds is a minimally invasive procedure.
Radioactive seeds are inserted through the perineum skin (the area between the scrotum and the anus) into the prostate gland. With correct planning, the surgeon can implant the radiation sources for maximum benefits to effective cancer treatment.
See also EchoSeed™, Prostate Ultrasound, Thermotherapy, High Intensity Focused Ultrasound, Urologic Ultrasound, Transurethral Sonography.
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 Further Reading:
  Basics:
B-mode Acquisition and Targeting (BAT) Ultrasound for Image-Guided Radiotherapy(.pdf)Open this link in a new window
Friday, 13 May 2005   by ric.uthscsa.edu    
  News & More:
Biplane ultrasound arrays with integrated multiplexing solution for enhanced diagnostic accuracy in endorectal and transvaginal imaging(.pdf)Open this link in a new window
   by www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov    
US Resources  
UltraSound Reimbursement - Directories - Preferential Sites - Education - Vaginal - Heart
 
Interventional UltrasoundMRI Resource Directory:<br> - Ultrasound Therapy -
 
Interventional ultrasound or ultrasonography uses invasive or surgical procedures. Its widest application is intravascular ultrasound imaging, for example used to measure atherosclerotic plaque. But it is useful also in urology for prostate treatment with high intensity focused ultrasound and intraabdominal conditions like endoscopic ultrasound.
Ultrasound guided interventions, like RF thermal ablation or biopsies are used e.g., in liver sonography, obstetric and gynecologic ultrasound, or thyroid ultrasound procedures.
See also Transurethral Sonography, Endocavitary Echography, and B-Mode Acquisition and Targeting.
Radiology-tip.comInterventional Radiology
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Radiology-tip.comMR Guided Interventions
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 Further Reading:
  Basics:
Metastatic bladder carcinoma to liver biopsy, proven with ultrasound guidanceOpen this link in a new window
   by rad.usuhs.mil    
Path from ultrasound guided biopsy on 18 Dec 03 pendingOpen this link in a new window
   by rad.usuhs.mil    
  News & More:
Biplane Color Flow Duplex Intravenous Intravascular Ultrasound for Arterial VisualizationOpen this link in a new window
2004   by enth.allenpress.com    
Path from ultrasound guided biopsy on 18 Dec 03 pendingOpen this link in a new window
   by rad.usuhs.mil    
Searchterm 'High Intensity Focused Ultrasound' was also found in the following services: 
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LithotripsyMRI Resource Directory:<br> - Ultrasound Therapy -
 
(ESWL) Extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy is a special use of kidney ultrasound, where high intensity focused ultrasound pulses are used to break up calcified stones in the kidney, bladder, or urethra. Pulses of sonic waves pulverize dense renal stones, which are then more easily passed through the ureter and out of the body in the urine. The ultrasound energy at high acoustic power levels is focused to a point exactly on the stone requiring an ultrasound scanning gel for maximum acoustic transmission.
Air bubbles in the ultrasound couplant, regardless of their size, degrade the performance of Lithotripsy and have the following effect:
Air bubbles smaller that 1/4 wavelength cause scattering of the sound waves as omni directional scatterers and less acoustic energy reaches the focal point. The result is less acoustic power at the focal point to disintegrate the kidney stone.
Air bubbles larger than 1/4 wavelength act as reflectors and deflects the acoustic energy off in a different direction. These results in less acoustic energy at the focal point.
Microbubbles dispersed throughout the ultrasound couplant layer change the average acoustic impedance of the gel layer (which reduces the total transmitted energy) and, due to refraction, change the focal point.
Radiology-tip.comIntravenous Pyelogram
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Radiology-tip.comLaser Induced Thermo Therapy
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• View the news results for 'Lithotripsy' (1).



 Further Reading:
  Basics:
Stone fragmentation by ultrasoundOpen this link in a new window
August 2004   by www.ias.ac.in    
Ultrasound in diagnostic and therapyOpen this link in a new window
   by www.anst.uu.se    
  News & More:
Sound-field modification with acoustic lenses for high-intensity focused ultrasound therapyOpen this link in a new window
   by www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov    
Searchterm 'High Intensity Focused Ultrasound' was also found in the following service: 
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Radiology  (1) Open this link in a new window
Liver SonographyMRI Resource Directory:<br> - Liver -
 
A liver sonography is a diagnostic tool to image the liver and adjoining upper abdominal organs such as the gallbladder, spleen, and pancreas. Deeper structures such as liver and pancreas are imaged at a lower frequency 1-6 MHz with lower axial and lateral resolution but greater penetration. The diagnostic capabilities in this area can be limited by gas in the bowel scattering the sound waves.
The application of microbubbles may be useful for detection of liver lesions and for lesion characterization. Some microbubbles have a liver-specific post vascular phase where they appear to be taken up by the reticuloendothelial system (RES). Dynamic contrast enhanced scans in a similar way as with CT or MRI can be used to studying the arterial, venous and tissue phase.
After a bolus injection, early vascular enhancement is seen at around 30sec in arterialized lesions (e.g., hepatocellular carcinomas (HCC), focal nodular hyperplasia (FNH)). Later enhancement is typical of hemangiomas with gradually filling towards the center. In the late phase at around 90sec, HCCs appear as defects against the liver background. Most metastases are relatively hypovascular and so do not show much enhancement and are seen as signal voids in the different phases.
Either with an intermittent imaging technique or by continuous scanning in a nondestructive, low power mode, characteristic time patterns can be used to differentiate lesions.
See also Medical Imaging, B-Mode, High Intensity Focused Ultrasound, Ultrasound Safety and Contrast Medium.
Radiology-tip.comAbdomen CT
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Radiology-tip.comLiver Imaging
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 Further Reading:
  Basics:
Optimizing Doppler and Color Flow US: Application to Hepatic Sonography(.pdf)Open this link in a new window
   by radiographics.rsna.org    
Cirrhosis, Ultrasound findingsOpen this link in a new window
   by rad.usuhs.mil    
  News & More:
Continuous Infusion Versus Bolus Injection Of Ultrasound Contrast Agents in Vascular Doppler Flow Imaging Response(.pdf)Open this link in a new window
Friday, 1 September 2000   by stroke.ahajournals.org    
Noninvasive ways to assess liver diseaseOpen this link in a new window
Friday, 1 February 2008   by www.eurekalert.org    
High-energy Ultrasound Sharpens View Of Liver TumorsOpen this link in a new window
Friday, 11 January 2008   by www.sciencedaily.com    
US Resources  
Veterinary UltraSound - Online Books - Manufacturers - UltraSound Training Courses - Research Labs - History of UltraSound
 
Related Searches:
 • Thermotherapy
 • Lithotripsy
 • Low Intensity Pulsed Ultrasound
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